la vie en rose

“Everything has beauty, but not everyone sees it.” — Confucius

From Wikipedia Picture Of The Day; September 20, 2014:
The Cantino planisphere is the earliest surviving map showing Portuguese geographic discoveries in the east and west. Named after Alberto Cantino, who smuggled it from Portugal to Italy in 1502, the map includes a fragmentary record of the Brazilian coast as well as detailed depictions of African coasts. The map is also the earliest extant nautical chart where places (in Africa and parts of Brazil and India) are depicted according to their astronomically observed latitudes. It is now held at the Biblioteca Estense in Modena, Italy.
Map: anonymous Portuguese cartographer

From Wikipedia Picture Of The Day; September 20, 2014:

The Cantino planisphere is the earliest surviving map showing Portuguese geographic discoveries in the east and west. Named after Alberto Cantino, who smuggled it from Portugal to Italy in 1502, the map includes a fragmentary record of the Brazilian coast as well as detailed depictions of African coasts. The map is also the earliest extant nautical chart where places (in Africa and parts of Brazil and India) are depicted according to their astronomically observed latitudes. It is now held at the Biblioteca Estense in Modena, Italy.

Map: anonymous Portuguese cartographer

(via wigmund)

likeafieldmouse:

Rosângela Rennó - Vulgo (Alias) (1998)

"These photographs originated from glass negatives in the Sao Paulo Penitentiary Archive, Brazil, which were identification photographs of prisoners, taken between 1920 and 1940.

Archives particularly interest Rennó because they are stored testimonies and traces of a past that is kept locked and forgotten most of the time, as are prisoners. 

Rennó’s photographs are recovered fragments from a decaying prison archive which highlights the gaps in memory and the history of those prisoners.”

zubat:

Did you know that the Bahamas have the greatest concentration of blue holes in the world? 

A blue hole is a cave or underwater sinkhole. They are also called vertical caves. They are named for the dramatic contrast between the dark blue, deep waters of their depths and the lighter blue of the shallows around them. The deep blue color is caused by the high transparency of water and bright white carbonate sand. Pictured above is the deepest blue hole in the world with underwater entrance — at 202 metres (663 ft) — called Dean’s Blue Hole, located in a bay west of Clarence Town on Long Island, Bahamas. (Read more on BCC and NatGeo)

(via dhemderso)