la vie en rose

“Everything has beauty, but not everyone sees it.” — Confucius

jtotheizzoe:

I think of all the -ographies, “selenography” is my favorite.

Enjoy these historical atlases of the moon, the earliest studies of the moon’s surface features (AKA “selenography”). The above were drawn by:

  • Michel van Langren (1645)
  • Johannes Hevelius (1647)
  • Giovanni Cassini (1679)
  • Tobias Mayer (1749)
  • Richard Andree (1881)
  • Henry White Warren (1879)

Previously: Check out Galileo’s watercolor illustrations of the moon, and find out how a few simple sketches realigned the heavens.

edithshead:

photo by Guy Bourdin for Charles Jourdan, 1978

edithshead:

photo by Guy Bourdin
for Charles Jourdan, 1978

Cast all your anxiety on Him because He cares for you.

—1 Peter 5:7 (via s-a-b-r)

(via s-a-b-r)

ancientart:

Sumerian headdress, made of gold, lapis lazuli, carnelian, and dates to ca. 2600–2500 B.C.

Kings and nobles became increasingly powerful and independent of temple authority during the course of the Early Dynastic period (2900–2350 B.C.), although the success of a king’s reign was considered to depend on support from the gods. A striking measure of royal wealth was the cemetery in the city of Ur, in which sixteen royal tombs were excavated in the 1920s and 1930s by Sir Leonard Woolley. These tombs consisted of a vaulted burial chamber for the king or queen, an adjoining pit in which as many as seventy-four attendants were buried, and a ramp leading into the grave from the ground.
This delicate chaplet of gold leaves separated by lapis lazuli and carnelian beads adorned the forehead of one of the female attendants in the so-called King’s Grave. In addition, the entombed attendants wore necklaces of gold and lapis lazuli, gold hair ribbons, and silver hair rings. Since gold, silver, lapis, and carnelian are not found in Mesopotamia, the presence of these rich adornments in the royal tomb attests to the wealth of the Early Dynastic kings as well as to the existence of a complex system of trade that extended far beyond the Mesopotamian River valley. (met)

Courtesy of & currently located at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, via their online collections, 33.35.3.

ancientart:

Sumerian headdress, made of gold, lapis lazuli, carnelian, and dates to ca. 2600–2500 B.C.

Kings and nobles became increasingly powerful and independent of temple authority during the course of the Early Dynastic period (2900–2350 B.C.), although the success of a king’s reign was considered to depend on support from the gods. A striking measure of royal wealth was the cemetery in the city of Ur, in which sixteen royal tombs were excavated in the 1920s and 1930s by Sir Leonard Woolley. These tombs consisted of a vaulted burial chamber for the king or queen, an adjoining pit in which as many as seventy-four attendants were buried, and a ramp leading into the grave from the ground.

This delicate chaplet of gold leaves separated by lapis lazuli and carnelian beads adorned the forehead of one of the female attendants in the so-called King’s Grave. In addition, the entombed attendants wore necklaces of gold and lapis lazuli, gold hair ribbons, and silver hair rings. Since gold, silver, lapis, and carnelian are not found in Mesopotamia, the presence of these rich adornments in the royal tomb attests to the wealth of the Early Dynastic kings as well as to the existence of a complex system of trade that extended far beyond the Mesopotamian River valley. (met)

Courtesy of & currently located at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, via their online collections33.35.3.

malformalady:

Sometimes the idea of sticking a another boring cube into our coffee gets us down. Luckily, a designer by the name of Snow Violet created these brilliant skull and cross bones cubes so we can make our morning routine of staring into our coffee cup a bit more sinister.
Photo credit: Olesya Turchuk

malformalady:

Sometimes the idea of sticking a another boring cube into our coffee gets us down. Luckily, a designer by the name of Snow Violet created these brilliant skull and cross bones cubes so we can make our morning routine of staring into our coffee cup a bit more sinister.

Photo credit: Olesya Turchuk