la vie en rose

“Everything has beauty, but not everyone sees it.” — Confucius

Fear is inevitable – I have to accept that - but I cannot allow it to paralyze me.

—Isabelle Allende (via onlinecounsellingcollege)

And how hard is it to land even a minimum-wage job? This year, the Ivy League college admissions acceptance rate was 8.9%. Last year, when Walmart opened its first store in Washington, D.C., there were more than 23,000 applications for 600 jobs, which resulted in an acceptance rate of 2.6%, making the big box store about twice as selective as Harvard and five times as choosy as Cornell. Telling unemployed people to get off their couches (or out of the cars they live in or the shelters where they sleep) and get a job makes as much sense as telling them to go study at Harvard.

crusherccme:

Found this gem in the 1996 Cornell Women’s Handbook. it’s what to say when a guy tries to get out of using a condom

WHY DON’T THEY STILL PUBLISH STUFF LIKE THIS

crusherccme:

Found this gem in the 1996 Cornell Women’s Handbook. it’s what to say when a guy tries to get out of using a condom

WHY DON’T THEY STILL PUBLISH STUFF LIKE THIS

(via taterforlife)

beingliberal:

The confusion, we can do it in the media: Beyoncé posted a photo to Instagram mirroring the famous “We Can Do It” poster. The photo racked up more than 300,000 likes within half an hour. Beyonce, a self-described “modern-day feminist,” incorporated ideas often symbolized by Rosie in her most recent album, her styling is not very original,there are dozens of “Rosies” on the Web, but in the world obsessed with celebrities it’s a good excuse to remind the story of real Rosie the Riveter. 

Rosie the Riveter,  became a cultural icon that recognizes the contributions made by women during World War II. Norman Rockwell’s image of “Rosie the Riveter” received mass distribution on the cover of the Saturday Evening Post on Memorial Day, May 29, 1943. Rockwell’s illustration features a brawny woman taking her lunch break with a rivet gun on her lap.

Rosie the Riveter is representing the American women who worked in factories during World War II, many of whom produced munitions and war supplies. These women sometimes took entirely new jobs replacing the male workers who were in the military. Rosie the Riveter is commonly used as a symbol of feminism and women’s economic power.

In 1942, Pittsburgh artist J. Howard Miller was hired by the Westinghouse Company’s War Production Coordinating Committee to create a series of posters for the war effort. One of these posters became the famous “We Can Do It!” image—an image that in later years would also be called “Rosie the Riveter,” though it was never given this title during the war. Miller is thought to have based his “We Can Do It!” poster on a United Press International wire service photograph taken of Ann Arbor, Michigan, factory worker Geraldine Hoff (later Doyle), who was 17 and briefly working as a metal-stamping machine operator. The intent of the poster was to keep production up by boosting morale, not to recruit more women workers. It was shown only to Westinghouse employees in the Midwest during a two-week period in February 1943, then it disappeared for nearly four decades. During the war, the name “Rosie” was not associated with the image, and it was not about women’s empowerment. It was only later, in the early 1980s, that the Miller poster was rediscovered and became famous, associated with feminism, and often mistakenly called “Rosie The Riveter.”

MORE INFORMATION ABOUT “Rosie The Riveter” and “We Can Do It” posters.

We live in a society that’s sexist in ways it doesn’t understand. One of the consequences is that men are extremely sensitive to being criticized by women. I think it threatens them in a very primal way, and male privilege makes them feel free to lash out.

This is why women are socialized to carefully dance around these issues, disagreeing with men in an extremely gentle manner. Not because women are nicer creatures than men. But because our very survival can depend on it.

No skin thick enough: The daily harassment of women in the game industry

The whole article sadly hits very close to home.

“Men are afraid that women will laugh at them. Women are afraid that men will kill them.”

(via areyha)

(Source: rosalarian, via likeneelyohara)

lich-tung:

gardenofthefareast:

A twentieth-century silver and clay Tibetan travelling amulet box; the protective deities, the 21 Taras are at the centre; the silver front is adorned with the wish-fulfilling jewel at the apex, Buddism’s Eight Auspicious Emblems at the sides and with a protective monster mask at the bottom.


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lich-tung:

gardenofthefareast:

A twentieth-century silver and clay Tibetan travelling amulet box; the protective deities, the 21 Taras are at the centre; the silver front is adorned with the wish-fulfilling jewel at the apex, Buddism’s Eight Auspicious Emblems at the sides and with a protective monster mask at the bottom.

lich-tung:

virtual-artifacts:

A Kashan cobalt-blue, turquoise and lustre painted pottery star tile. Ilkhanid Iran, Late 13th century.


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lich-tung:

virtual-artifacts:

A Kashan cobalt-blue, turquoise and lustre painted pottery star tile. Ilkhanid Iran, Late 13th century.

pilipi:

as a dollvogue italia february 1993ph: steven meisel
model: benedicte loyen

pilipi:

as a doll
vogue italia february 1993
ph: steven meisel

model: benedicte loyen

(via lesbowie)